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Doctors and researchers encourage people to be mindful of their brain health

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

DOTHAN, Ala. (WTVY) – Alzheimer’s and Dementia affect millions of people worldwide. Changes in the brains of people with the disease can start decades before the person actually experiences symptoms, that’s according to the AHEAD Study. With June being Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness month, doctors and researchers of the AHEAD study are urging people to be conscious about their health and their loved ones. Doctor Josh Grill, a University of California Irvine professor, shares tips to improve and become mindful of your brain health. He said taking part in physical exercise, eating a healthy diet, getting a good night’s sleep…

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How exercise may help prevent Alzheimer’s

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Exercise could be a powerful defense against Alzheimer’s disease. Three dementia researchers explain how it works. NOVA – When it comes to dementia prevention, sleep and exercise may work together, says neuroscientist Miranda Chappel-Farley, a Ph.D. candidate at University of California, Irvine. … Together, they create a powerful bulwark against dementia and represent a lifestyle factor ignored at your peril, says Chappel-Farley, who cautions against “targeting exercise but not paying attention to sleep.” Read more here > Related posts: UCI MIND and AlzOC present free online conference on Alzheimer’s disease Panel of experts from around the nation to give updates…

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New treatments for psychosis in Alzheimer’s disease – pimavanserin and the FDA, redux

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Contributed by David Sultzer, MD and Joshua Grill, PhD An FDA Advisory Committee met on June 17 to provide input to the Agency regarding the effectiveness of pimavanserin for the treatment of psychosis in Alzheimer’s disease.  The Committee voted 9 to 3, with the majority finding insufficient evidence of effectiveness in this population. This input comes on the heels of an FDA review last year that declined to approve pimavanserin for psychosis in a broad group of dementia syndromes, including Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, Lewy body and Parkinson’s disease dementia, and frontotemporal dementias.  At that time, the Agency felt that…

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UCI researchers aim to diversify clinical research participation with $3.7 million NIH grant

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

The multidisciplinary team will focus on participant recruitment and retainment for Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders research What is the best way to recruit participants to join a clinical studies registry, and can such registries help better diversify clinical research samples? These are two critical questions that UCI researchers are tackling with a new National Institutes of Health grant, “Recruiting and Retaining Participants from Disadvantaged Neighborhoods in Registries.” The work will be led by Joshua Grill, professor of psychiatry & human behavior in the School of Medicine and of neurobiology & behavior in the School of Biological Sciences, and by Daniel Gillen,…

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UCI wins 5-year, $14M NIH grant to study brain circuits susceptible to aging, Alzheimer’s disease

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Findings will advance development of better early diagnostic tools, new treatment strategies The University of California, Irvine has been awarded a five-year, $14 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study brain circuits that are susceptible to aging and Alzheimer’s disease. The research findings will advance the development of early diagnostic tools and the discovery of new treatment strategies. Xiangmin Xu, Ph.D., UCI Chancellor’s Fellow of anatomy and neurobiology and principal investigator, will lead an interdisciplinary, multi-institutional team whose goal is to construct comprehensive, high-resolution maps of specific neuron types and their connections in critical brain circuits whose…

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UCI MIND and UPENN Colleagues offer new guidance

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

In a blunt rejection of current norms, two leaders of biomarker disclosure research argue research participants should have the opportunity to know whether they have biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease . Biomarkers, or biological indicators of a disease, are essential to the study and diagnosis of Alzheimer’s and other diseases that cause dementia. Clinicians use imaging such as MRI and PET scans to measure biomarkers and make accurate diagnoses. Blood tests are fast becoming available too. The tests also allow researchers to develop targeted drug therapies. But in both clinical care and research, biomarker results are infrequently disclosed. Insurers typically do…

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MIND Matters | Quarterly Newsletter | Spring 2022

By Commentary, Community Events, COVID-19, In the News, Participants

Message from the Director Dear Friends of UCI MIND, Welcome to the new normal. COVID case numbers have surged again, but our research continues to push forward and our researchers have enthusiastically resumed in-person activities that have been few and far between over the last two years. This includes attending and holding scientific conferences, generally through hybrid formats, allowing those comfortable and ready to reconvene in-person to present new data, exchange ideas and forge new collaborations. Some UCI MIND investigators recently traveled to Barcelona, Spain to attend the International Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease and Parkinson’s Disease and related neurological disorders…

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UCI MIND postdoctoral fellow explores the link between spatial navigation and Alzheimer’s

By Commentary, In the News

Spatial navigation is one of the cognitive processes that is affected early in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Liz Chrastil’s lab and a REMIND co-chair, Dr. Vaisakh Puthusseryppady published a paper as part of his doctoral research on the use of Global Positioning Software (GPS) to track outdoor movement patterns of people with AD in the community. He found that when alone, participants with AD tended to make fewer outings into the community, and once outside, tended to be more restricted in their movement when compared to their unimpaired counterparts.  At UCI, Dr. Puthusseryppady is advancing this work by…

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Letter from the NIA acknowledges Alzheimer’s advances made at UCI MIND

By Commentary, In the News

Dr. Richard Hodes, the Director of the National Institute on Aging, published a blog about the significant progress that has been made towards advancing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research in the past decade.  He cites several important accomplishments and specifically acknowledges the new mouse model that was developed at UC Irvine as part of MODEL-AD.  Led by Drs. LaFerla, Tenner, Green, Mortazavi, Baglietto-Vargas, and MacGregor, the team created the first animal model that closely resembles the human form of sporadic AD. Click here to read Dr. Hodes’ blog post reflecting on the 10-year anniversary of the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease Related…

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